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Posted on Feb 8, 2015 in STUDY

A return of an environmentalist

Cambodian Student Association in Canberra (CSAC) is pleased to hear from Sarou Long, who graduated from the Australian National University (ANU) and returned to his home country, Cambodia, in December 2014. Sarou has kindly shared with us about his academic experience at the ANU and vision as follows. 

CSAC: Could you please introduce yourself?

Sarou: My name is Sarou Long. I have successfully completed Master degree in Climate Change at the ANU in 2014. Before undertaking my Masters degree in Australia, I had around seven years experience in natural resource management and livelihoods programs with local and international organisations. My work has included working with local communities and local and provincial governments to develop and implement projects, including forestry management, establishment of tree nurseries, water harvesting and water resource management, community accountability and management training, disaster risk reduction, and environmental education awareness projects. These experiences have inspired to continue my degree in environmental management and climate change in Australia.

Sarou 1

CSAC: What did you learn while at the ANU?

Sarou: My Master degree at the ANU has focused on Climate Change. I have learnt about aspect of climate change adaptation and mitigation, natural resource management, environmental management, strategies to address the vulnerability to climate change. Particularly, I have learnt about the fundamentals of climate change within the framework of the global climate change system and policy.

CSAC: What is your plan after returning to Cambodia?

Sarou: I am passionate to work in the environmental sector; I want to play a major role in addressing one of the biggest environmental issues, climate change. Thus, I am interested to bring the knowledge and skills that I have gained from the ANU to influence policy makers, and the wider public to take climate change seriously. Cambodia remains one of the poorest nations in the world, and to achieve poverty reduction and sustainable development, Cambodia will need effective planning for environmental management. With knowledge and skills from the ANU, I hope that it enables me to better design, analyze, and evaluate projects and thus contribute to more effective and wise development.

We, the Cambodian Student Association in Canberra, wish Sarou all the best for his future endeavor.

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